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A Game for Lewes Priory on March 12th

Archaeologists are detectives: they dig beneath the soil to find items from long ago. At Priory Park they are hoping this will help them find out more about the history of the Priory and what it was like when monks lived here nearly 500 years ago.

De Montfort the Dog is leading today’s mission. Are you ready to help him? You can book a free game here. A game lasts 30 minutes and there are 8 sessions between 12:00 and 16:00. We should have 6 tablets available – one tablet to be shared between a family of 4. Any unreserved tablets will be available on the day – so if you haven’t booked you may still get a chance to play.

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Persona: The Teacher

Meet Andy. Andy has been teaching in a Hertfordshire primary school for around 10 years. He loves tech and gadgets and shares his passion with his students. This can be anything from using Makey Makey to create a banana keyboard to producing stop frame animations as part of the school play. He’s not fazed by the new school computer curriculum; in fact, he’s been coding with his kids for years!

Andy is always on the look out for new and exciting stuff and if that includes a smartphone or a tablet, even better. So he was amongst the first to start using Invisible Buildings in lessons (even when the product was being prototyped). As a way of kicking off the course on the Romans, Andy said “it immediately engaged my class with a unique way of letting them participate and start to understand aspects of both history and archaeology – this is not something that one could get close to at a museum or on a field trip. Even the parents were enthused.”

Since the move from smartphones to tablet, Andy is pleased that Invisible Buildings is much easier to use, even for his less confident colleagues. Now he is acting as an advisor in his local area and working with other schools. “When we first started using Invisible Buildings we needed the guys that developed the product to come over and help us out,” says Andy. “Now it practically runs itself – and if anyone needs help or forgets what to do, there are step-by-step instructions on the website.”

Andy is now looking forward to some of the other Invisible Building games that are currently in production, and is keen to contribute to the microsites that will be “online museums” with other quality material based around the subjects, with access to experts and the ability for teachers to add their own material and ideas.

 

 

 

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Playing with the Pipes

There are 2 posts associated with pipes: in this section we discuss how you use the pipes when playing Invisible Buildings. The other post tells you how to make the equipment from scratch.

Background

2014-03-05 10.56.08When we first dreamed up the concept of Invisible Buildings, the idea was for a game to be played on a smartphone. Our budget only allowed for 3 phones (HTC Hero) and we had a problem as we needed to try out our games in classes of up to 30 children. By dividing them into 2 groups of 15, we were able to run with 3 groups of 5. But they couldn’t all be looking at the phone at the same time – answer, give them other tasks to do. We supplied them with clipboards, stopwatches, hooters (for when they found something) and a set of pipes that could be configured to look like a metal detector or a geophys machine (and as such required the help of one or more child to hold or carry) – an idea was born.

Interestingly, having the pipework not only did the trick but actually enhanced the experience by encouraging teamwork (on more than one occasion teachers commented that this was the first time they had seen children working together). For me, one of the most interesting parts of the Invisible Buildings project has been the constant evolution (to the teacher that said, “it doesn’t look finished”, you are absolutely right. We are currently on design 5 and have no intention of stopping.

Anyway, you are here because you want to build a set of pipes so here we go. Of course, from a technical point of view there is no need to have any pipes at all. You can just use your tablet, but … well, it’s just more fun, and if you are playing in less than ideal weather conditions, some sort of box to put the tablet in, is highly desirable. And again, there is no need to build exactly as we have described – yours may be better (and if it is, please let us know).

Let’s start

Some of the pieces and in particular the box that houses the tablet, are glued together, and where we can’t we use button clips to assist in a robust and childproof  connection (picture from Magrenko). When joining the sections with the clips just depress the button and push the pipe into the connector until the button locates in the hole. Just let Johnny try and pull that apart! I am still in two minds about what bits we clip and those we don’t – as when new the pipe and connector form a fairly robust joint. How these will seem two years down the line is another matter. Where stress is exerted when playing the game we will always use clips.

To remove a clipped pipe, depress the button and twist (rather than pull) so the button is inside the pipe and then twist the two bits apart.

buttonclips

Through a process of evolution we are now able to get all the bits needed into drawstring gym bag that can be carried by a child, and yet still can emerge into different machines for the five games. Here’s how that looks. There is:

  • box into which the tablet is placed. The box is surrounded by a set of pipes which we will detail in a bit, and to which other bits can be added.
  • below the box on the right you can see two 45 ends (45 degree bends with end caps).
  • and below this the metal detector base (yes, it is a frisby).
  • to the left is the T piece (3 pipes arranged at a T).
  • and to the left of this are two connector arms ( 2 pipes with T connectors at one end)
  • and 2 plain arms (just pipes)

2014-03-05 10.58.46 2014-03-05 11.01.22

We will now run through how the pipes look in each of the five games. In order these are for the metal detector, squirrel sorter, geophys, mole digger. We use the same configuration for diggory drop as in the squirrel sorter – the logic behind this is as there is quite a bit of running needed – keep the equipment light.

Here is the metal detector layout. We have the base screwed to a 45 degree bend. We will show more of the constructional details later. Here we are more interested in how the bits are assembled for game play.

2014-03-05 11.09.49 2014-03-05 11.10.14

Below we have the T piece which is uses in all games except metal detection. Here the T is simply attached to the box, with 45 ends on the other arms. We use this in Squirrel Sort and Diggory Drop.

 

We now see the geophys set up (Geophys was the inspiration for using pipes in the first place, as this is exactly how some geophys equipment looks and before black was the new white (see here). Here we attach 4 arms (first the 2 connector arms and then the plain ones) to the T piece which is still connected to the box.

Geophys 1 2014-03-05 11.14.43

Finally we see how to set up the Mole digger. Again the T piece is connected to the box. On one end we have a 45 end. The other has one connector arm, with the other connector arm below. Plus one plain arm above and the second to the side with a 45 end. This arrangement makes it easy for the person looking at the tablet to go round in circles. The other parts can be held onto by team members keeping it all steady.

2014-03-05 11.19.20  2014-03-05 11.20.00

 

You might like to print out this page to refer to when out playing the game. And as I said previously, if you have some ideas about how we can improve the equipment please let us know.

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Creating your location picture

First, you don’t absolutely have to have a picture. The default image is (or will be) a non-specific grid. The reason for having an image is that it will help you orientate yourself around the play area, by linking real items such as trees and buildings to their images on the screen (believe me it does help). It is also useful if you are going to set coordinates at the play area.

pavilion1Any image will do, but these are some tips that will help you. The image you want to load onto the tablet will have an ideal size of 800×657 pixels. It it is not, then the image will automatically scale to the size you upload but it may be distorted. But let’s get our image first and worry about size later. I generally start with Google Maps, or to be more specific, Google Maps Engine – as this will pavilion2allow you to derive coordinates more easily.

Click on “create a new map” and search for your area. I am going to create an image at the park by the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. You might choose to use the map view, or preferably, a satellite view (you do this by selecting the appropriate one from the Base Map drop down). Or you might choose to superimpose one on the other.

Just looking at your selected area on a map, raises a few questions about how you are going to play, particularly if it is in a public area. For example, are you going to be able to access all the areas within your selected area, or are there flower beds, or a large statue. And perhaps more importantly, are you going to be running between lots of people enjoying a peaceful picnic!

Next, you need to work out how big the play area is going to be. If it is too small, you won’t get the accuracy you need to play properly. Too big, and you may get exhausted with too much running. From experience I would say that a diagonal distance of 50m is about as small as you can go. 100m would be better, and you need to bear in mind the area is always in a rectangle, with the upper and lower borders running east to west, and the right and left borders running north to south. This means that the playable area of your field may well be smaller than the whole area available. See here, where the actually area is quite a bit smaller than the total.

smallarea

Note, too, that if you are in a field the chosen image might just be green, which won’t be very helpful. It may have markings such as for a football pitch, but where the markings are now may be different from when the satellite view was taken. So what can you do?

Brunswick schemYou can use the image as the basis of a drawing which can be derived from the map, such as this one on the left.

Or you can make sure you have the edge of buildings  or other features in view.

Or you could add labels, saying things like “school in this direction”, or “bicycle sheds over here”. These you can create in the Maps Engine, or you might add them using a picture editor once you have cut and pasted the image from the screen. Talking of this, you may have a favorite way of grabbing screen images, but if not, here’s what I do…

… I use the Chrome browser which allows you to add extensions. There are several screen grabbers that can be used, but I favour Awesome Screenshot which will also allow you to annotate and crop your image.

I capture a larger area of the map than I need and then (in Awesome Screenshot) crop it either to the size I want or larger. Below I have added the annotations from AS. But I also use another extension for Chrome, a picture editor called PixLR (you can use your favorite one if you prefer  – sometimes if I just want to adjust the picture size I use Paint)

Pavilion Play AreaHere I have used PixLR to resize to the exact height and then crop to the exact width. I have then brightened up the colours and now it is ready to upload to the tablet.Pavilion Play Area

 

The one final thing I might want to do is to grab the coordinates of the NW and SE corners using the Maps Engine so that I can load them up to the tablet in advance. Note that I can just set these when I am actually on the playing field. The difficulty of doing on the field is that I might, as here, have chosen a corner that is made inaccessible by a bush. Also, unless you have put the corners at an easily identifiable point, you might not be too accurate. Here’s how you can get the values from the Maps Engine ….

… In an ideal world you would simply press a button and they would pop up. Here it is not as easy as that – but not mind bendingly difficult either. In the image below I have created 2 markers – A = NW corner and B = SE Corner. I have actually adjusted the positions after getting my image correctly formated.

Pavilion Play 1To get the coordinates you need to go to the HTML code page (if you are using Chrome it is CTRL-U and then searching (CTRL-F) for the text of your marker e.g. SE corner. You will then see the the pair of numbers close to, but before the name. Cut and paste and store safely, maybe in the description part of the marker in Maps Engine – you don’t actually need it to 10 decimal places, 4 or 5 should do (if you fancy a little exercise, work out what the difference in accuracy means for each decimal point).

[[\”gme_geometry_\”,,,,,,[[[50.822559907956034,-0.1380908489227295,0.0]\n]\n,[]\n,[]\n]\n,0]\n,[\”name\”,,,,\”SE Corner\”,,,0]\n,[\”description\”,,,,\”\”,,,0]\n,[\”place_ref\”,,,,,,,0]\n,[\”feature_order\”,,,,,,,0]\n,[\”gx_metafeatureid\”,,,,,,,0]\n,[\”gx_routeinfo\”,,,,,,,0]\n,[\”gx_image_links\”,,,,,,,0]\n]\n]\n]\n,,

And that’s it – have fun!

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The Five Games – press Play to win

If you have looked at our video, you will see 3 games played outdoors, followed by another drag-and-drop puzzle indoors. The new version now has 5 games to be played outdoors. The game has a general narrative where various archaeological clues lead to the discovery of a building, it’s mapping out, digging up, and finally exhibiting in a museum. Whilst the overall aim is to have fun, the simulation draws upon techniques used on real archaeology digs. You can see some of these techniques for real if you go on a dig, or from the comfort of your armchair particularly on programmes like Time Team. When you press Play, or when the game changes between players, a short version of the instructions appear. This is just to remind you what to do. It helps to have a good overall idea of what you are doing in advance. The texts for the 5 games are shown below too, but here is how it looks on the tablet. text-page Once you press ok, you will have started the game, and the timer is ticking so be ready to get going. There are a few things that are common to all games, in particular, the area to the right of the screen. Here we have:

  • The current player who is in charge of the tablet, the score (oh dear, Richard, you have null points).
  • The time left in this part of the game for you as a player
  • A list of all the people in the team (in order of play) and their total points to date
  • The progress bar which gives an indication of how far through the game you have got (based on how long you set the game time to – i.e. if it is one hour, after 30 minutes the progress bar will be half red and half green)

metal-detectorLooking now at this screen as the Metal Detector, you can see a set of boxes to the left where our “found” objects will be displayed when detected, and the central green area which is the control centre for the metal detector. Most of this area whirls and dings when in exploring. The key area to watch is the “hotter-colder” meter. Currently this has 3 boxes, green when in range, yellow when close, and red when very close – soon we will upgrade this to a multi bar graph display. According to the difficulty level, we will also display your distance from the object. This is the help text for the metal detector: Who’s used a metal detector before? Guess what it’s for. If your kit is not set up for detecting (see image) then do it now. This is what the display will look like. Notice the meter – as you get nearer to an object it will (colour change – meter moves??). But not everything you find will be valuable, so good luck and off you go. And remember when not in charge of the computer – please help carrying the equipment. Now let’s move on to the next game – the Squirrel Sorter.squirel-sorter In this game we see the objects that we found with the metal detector and have to move them either to the good area or the bad one (or bin). Note that you can see where we are at the top right hand side of the screen – looking like a little tadpole. The round bit indicates our position and the line, our direction of travel. Move to an object, click on it, and it will move with you. Depending on your judgement, move to the museum or the bin. Click when you are directly over it to score your points.

The help text on the screen is as follows: Decide if the artifacts are Roman which should be sent to the museum or junk which should be thrown away. geofiz We now come to the GeoPhys part of the game. Here is where we find evidence of a building “hiding” underground. When geophys (or geo-physics) is carried out on a real dig, the electrical state of the ground is measured with sensitive equipment – really consider it like underground radar.

Normally, the geophys survey is carried out by marching up and down the field rather like one would cut the grass, but our machine is more sophisticated and gives you points to aim towards (see the grey circle in the picture above). Once you reach this point, you will be directed to the next point and so on. As you move, so a layer beneath the surface is exposed, and this continues until the whole picture is revealed.

Note that this and the following games all use the image that you have uploaded to the tablet. You can put anything here, but obviously something helpful is prefered.

Our guidance text says: Introduction to show that things underground can be “seen”  First way is will aerial photos and then showing that the ground can be investigated like x-rays with the equipment they are about to use. Instructions for putting together the equipment. Plan for how do walk – will vary according to difficulty (width of “reveal” to vary – and to make more fun will be given target points to go to   mole-dig

Now we know where the building lies underground, it’s time to start digging. A number of points have been selected where we think it will be good to dig. You need to move to these in turn and dig. We assemble the digging machine and with the help of the team, we run round in circles. (What is actually happening here is that we are watching the compass go round – so as long as the tablet is going in circles we are digging). You can see the mole going round to indicate how fast we are digging, and you can see the progress we are making by the progress of the cannister as it goes into the ground.

Once you have got down far enough, the building piece is lifted up and we can see it. In the next game we will make a model of this and take it to the museum.

Here are our on-screen instructions: We now want you to dig up the building that is underground. Of course you can do this really, but we have created what we call the “Mole Digger” By running around at certain points the mole will go into the ground and look around and create an image of what is there. Do this in 12 points and you should have the whole building We will put the geophys diagram on the screen to help you select the best points to dig. If the mole thinks the place selected is not good he will tell you digory-drop We have arrived at the last game: Diggory Drop. Now you should be able to see all the bits that have been dug up. Your final task is to move them to the assembly area in the museum. You do this as per the Squirrel Sort by going to a bit and selecting it, and then moving with it to the correct place in the museum. Once it is there, go and get the next bit, until at the very end, they are all in position. Once it is all done, you will be able to see what the building looked like, back when it was new.

The text on screen goes like this: I am just collecting the pieces you found.  If you drag them onto the stage, you will see what the complete building looks like.

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A look around the game

iconBegin by clicking on the “LocoMan” logo to open the start page. Currently this page looks like the image below and gives you information on which version you are running. If you have to get in touch for any reason, we will need to know the version you are running, the type of tablet (.e.g Nexus 7) and the version of Android you are running (from the tablet settings menu). When you have finished admiring this screen press OK to continue.

start-page

The first thing to do is to give your team a name. In my example, I have been really boring and called it XXX but I imagine that you can do something better (click change to start editing). You then add the players: as you will see this can be anything between 1 and 4 players. During the course of the game, each player in turn will be instructed to take the controls. And you can also keep a check on your scores from here too (notice the Upload Scores button – this function is not implemented yet – but coming soon!).home-page

There is also a button that allows you to change which of the 5 games you are playing. In the normal course of events, do not touch this button (in any event it will be going soon). The main button on this page is Play – as the system is set up it will take you to each of the games in turn, and by the order of players you have entered. But before we do this, I want to run through the settings. Indeed, whenever you play the game in a new place you will need to make some changes.

settings1

Note that when you make any changes in the settings section you will need to press the “Start new game” button before you play. AND when you do this, all previous scores will be lost and you will start again from the beginning – you have been warned.

The first settings are to do with the size and look of your playing area. For some of the games, we set a background image to the screen: this is useful in finding your bearings in the play area. This won’t help if your entire area is grass, but if there are, say, the edge of buildings, that can be helpful. We have used images taken from satellite pictures to accomplish this, but one could equally well create a hand drawn map (or use a combination of the two). Your image should be in proportion to the size of the screen (800×657) is what I have been using). If you don’t get the proportion right, the image will distort. Uploading the image to the tablet can be done in several ways. I prefer either to connect my tablet to the PC using the USB cable and then transfer the file onto the tablet. Better still (and it offers a number of benefits for the tablet user in general) is to get a Dropbox account (free storage in the cloud which looks like a the same directory on your PC, tablet, whatever) and any files that you put here from your computer can be seen on the tablet too (with no wired connection)

settings2

Because the games use GPS, we need to know where we are and what size our playing field is. There is separate information (here?) to show you how to it, and some suggestions for making a really good game, but for now I just want to say that you describe a rectangle aligned North-South/East-West by defining the North West corner and the South East corner. Either you can do this by grabbing the coordinates from, say, an online map, and entering them here; or when you are about to play you can set the corners by walking to the relevant places and clicking on the buttons.

settings3

The next section allows you to set up a number of variables which affect what happens during game play.

  • Difficulty – easy/normal/hard. There are various elements which make it more difficult to play. These are described elsewhere but general advice is to start easy and then when you play again you have the choice to make it harder
  • Game time. This is the total time for the game so if you have 4 players, each player will only have a quarter of this time. At some point we may allow users to adjust the time for each of the 5 games – how long it takes depends on the size of the field, how good you are at playing, how many findable objects you have, and a bit of luck.
  • Debug mode. Ignore for the time being
  • Run and Drop. Game 2: squirrel sort and game 5: Diggory Drop, require players to run to an object and “pick it up” then run to another location and drop it. If this box is not ticked, then the game can be played by dragging and dropping on the screen – less fun, but ok if you don’t have too much time

settings4The last section refers to the Game Pack. Invisible Buildings is made up of 2 parts, the Engine, which is the app that you download from the store, and the Pack which has all the graphics, sounds etc that makes the game either say, a Roman Villa, or an Elizabethan theatre. The default pack is the Roman Villa, but others are available. It is even possible to design your own.

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Let’s get started!

You want to play Invisible Buildings – here’s the definitive guide to getting started

First catch your hare – or rather buy your tablet. We recommend the Google Nexus 7 (currently £129.99 from Argus).

Next, to get the App you need to join our Beta programme. Just ask at iv-beta@lomomatrix.com

It’s useful too, to have another app GPS Status – comprehensive tool for managing your GPS. Get it here and we recommend using it before you play any game. You should see a range of satellites that are being picked up by your tablet, and ideally see an accuracy of around 4 meters (if it shows much more that 8, you probably need to find a new spot – range can be affected by high buildings close by, or a lot of overhanging trees)

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How to make the equipment

Introduction

First off, you don’t have to build a set of pipes – the game will run perfectly well with just the tablet – the exception being that the tablet box we have designed lets you see what’s going on in bright sunlight and protects the tablet from mechanical harm and drizzle too. If you don’t want to build your own set, then we have organised for the people who make the boxes to supply a complete kit. It will cost in the region of £80, whereas you can make everything for around £30.

Anyway, building a set of equipment is fun so …

Let’s start

The general philosophy is to create using solvent weld plastic waste pipe. Where possible we weld the bits together, and where we can’t we use button clips to assist in a robust and childproof  connection (picture from Magrenko). There are some photos how how the kit looks in its various guises below and there is a shopping list at the end of the page with everything that you need. Most of which you can get from your local DIY shop but I recommend Screwfix because you can place an order and then have it delivered. Velcro and Frisby you can get from eBay along with a gel case for your tablet. The boxes have been made specially by Striking Displays for Invisible buildings (they will supply the complete set of parts too) and the button clips come from Magrenko.

You will only need simple tools – a drill, saw and screwdriver plus some solvent weld cement. To get smooth ends when cutting pipe, I use a mitre saw in a guide such as this, but if you are careful a hacksaw will be fine – anything less than straight can alway be hidden in connector. An alternative is to use a plastic pipe cutter (about £15 from Screwfix).

You need a screwdriver to attach the Frisby to an end cap, and a drill to make holes for the button clips. The hole size is 12mm and it is best to make the hole with a connector and pipe in place and drill through them both. If you have access to a pillar drill, the task is simple. If you are using a hand drill, I recommend a special bit which will make a perfect hole (a normal bit will wobble and it may end up oval). I use an auger bit which drill slowly into the plastic and then cuts the hole. I put a block of wood inside where I am cutting as there is a tendency when the hole is drilled for the bit to go right through and start cutting the other side. Best to practise on a spare piece of pipe first.

Start by cutting all the pipe pieces to the correct size – try to be accurate but you have a little leeway when you push a pipe into a connector.

Two of the 500 mm pipes have nothing joined to them, and the other 2 have a T connector. Note that the Ts are not symmetrical – it makes no difference which way you attach them, but for neatness make sure that the two of them match. Note that the solvent weld cement is very quick acting so be sure to push the pipes right into the connector. Best strategy is to brush a layer of cement into the far part of the connector rather than on the pipe – if you do this, you will find that it oozes out. There are regulations for the sale of this cement – i.e. not for children, so you need to be aware of this.

You can now glue end caps to two 135 degree connectors and make up the cross piece consisting of a T and 3 bits of pipe. Note again that the T connector is non symmetrical – which is why the left and right bits are of different lengths.

The Frisbee is connected to an end cap (the actual cap). When we come to make up the metal detector we can screw the cap directly onto one of the end cap/135 degree connectors. In an ideal world, you could solvent weld to 2 bits together, but unfortunately, Frisbees tend to be made out of a different sort of plastic. So you can either screw in place with self-tapping flange screws (i.e. screws with a big head), or I guess you could sandwich the bits between 2 x 30mm washers and bolt together.

frisbee-connector frisbee-screws

As with the Frisbee, the box plastic is non-weldable so we have devised a way to build the pipework around it so that it is held firmly in place. This is achieved with semi-circular holes in the front of the box and additional plastic pieces at the back. Note that once again, because the T connector is not symmetrical, the pipes joining it are not equal. Study the photograph carefully before glueing. We suggest that you make the front and back bits first – the front 90 degree bends will grip the outside of the box, thus at the sides, the pipes make good handles whilst using the equipment.

Expanded View 1

and finally in more detail where we put the clips

buttonclips

All the bits needed into drawstring gym bag that can be carried by a child, and yet still can emerge into different machines for the five games. Here’s how that looks. There is:

  • a box into which the tablet is placed. The box is surrounded by a set of pipes which we will detail in a bit, and to which other bits can be added.
  • below the box on the right you can see two 135 ends (135 degree bends with end caps).
  • and below this the metal detector base (yes, it is a frisby).
  • to the left is the T piece (3 pipes arranged at a T).
  • and to the left of this are two connector arms ( 2 pipes with T connectors at one end)
  • and 2 plain arms (just pipes)

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We will now run through how the pipes look in each of the five games. In order these are for the metal detector, squirrel sorter, geophys, mole digger. We use the same configuration for diggory drop as in the squirrel sorter – the logic behind this is as there is quite a bit of running needed – keep the equipment light.

Here is the metal detector layout. We have the base screwed to a 135 degree bend. We will show more of the constructional details later. Here we are more interested in how the bits are assembled for game play.

2014-03-05 11.09.49 2014-03-05 11.10.14

Below we have the T piece which is uses in all games except metal detection. Here the T is simply attached to the box, with 135 ends on the other arms. We use this in Squirrel Sort and Diggory Drop.

 

We now see the geophys set up (Geophys was the inspiration for using pipes in the first place, as this is exactly how some geophys equipment looks and before black was the new white (see here). Here we attach 4 arms (first the 2 connector arms and then the plain ones) to the T piece which is still connected to the box.

Geophys 1 2014-03-05 11.14.43

Finally we see how to set up the Mole digger. Again the T piece is connected to the box. On one end we have a 45 end. The other has one connector arm, with the other connector arm below. Plus one plain arm above and the second to the side with a 135 end. This arrangement makes it easy for the person looking at the tablet to go round in circles. The other parts can be held onto by team members keeping it all steady.

2014-03-05 11.19.20  2014-03-05 11.20.00

 

2014-03-05 11.02.432014-03-05 11.01.57

Parts List

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